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Let me Frame it for you: A review of

At this years DEVELOP3D Live Conference (in March) the company formally known as Mainframe2 officially relaunched as Frame.

Who is Frame?

Never heard of Mainframe2? Me neither, but this is not because they were not successful, but that their previous target market was the software vendors, not the end user. Demand from users (and companies) for a hosted site where they could put their apps, and not just apps from one vendor, lead to the Frame relaunch and their new offerings.

This is a different spin on using the cloud. Unlike cloud based applications like Fusion and Onshape, think of Frame as an online computer. Using Frame you put your software, applications, and related tools in the cloud and access it through a web browser, anywhere, on just about any device.


Here’s what the brochure says

“Frame is a software platform for the cloud that delivers Windows desktop applications through a browser. This means users can access any Windows applications from any device (PC, Chromebook, iPad, Kindle, Macbook, iPhone, etc.) without installing anything locally, and administrators can manage all their users, applications and environments from a single location. Even high-end, graphically-intensive applications including CAD tools run great on Frame since each user’s session can be backed by powerful GPUs”

Need proof that the technology works? Siemens has been (and  is still using) the technology to host their SolidEdge trials.  Other apps that run within frame include Solidworks, Solidedge, Siemens NX, Creo, Vectorworks, Ansys…. with many more soon to be announced. I also proved that both AutoCAD and Inventor run just fine within the application. [They are really looking for Autodesk, Autodesk Resellers, and Autodesk Users for proof of concepts… if you know of someone, or are someone, reach out to them]

So, Why would I use Frame?

The flexibility of working from any location, only requiring an internet connection and a browser. Think sitting in Starbucks, kicking back a Pumpkin Spice Latte, working on your Inventor / Solidworks / 3DSMax / Photoshop / <insert application here> without trucking around your big heavy workstation-grade laptop. And… Unlike moving to Fusion or Onshape there is no need to change your software.

Another benefit of using the Frame technology is the ability to ramp up and ramp down with the change in staff size / project load. As a monthly subscription you can easily add and remove licenses. You can also scale up the hardware as you need and you only pay for the time that you use.

When you have applications that because of cost or infrequent usage you can not / do not want to deploy individual licenses is a real sweet spot for Frame. This is especially true when the users are distributed across multiple locations. In this scenario you could load up a system with the applications and when the user needs the application they launch the Frame system. Nothing needs to be installed on their local system, yet they have access whenever they need.

Frame - All-in-one-IT

Frame is available in a few “flavours” which for individuals and commercial business really boil down to Frame for Personal (1-user to install their apps) and Frame for Business. Frame for Business is a single administered “sandbox” published to a pool for users to access. A bonus is that it really is “IT light” in that your software only needs to be installed and setup one time and then can be accessed by any number of users from the Frame Launchpad (in a browser).

Frame in Action

I was very fortunate to get a live demo of the offering from Carsten Puls and Jared Conway. It was very clear right from the beginning that there has been a lot of thought put into the offering, really focussing on what the end-user needs. Frame is easy to use and you will literally be up and running in a few minutes.

Even the little things, like putting a task list right into the Windows wallpaper, were added to streamline the learning / implementation process.

Frame - Desktop Tips

In the background Frame is using 9 regionally based datacenters. Upon your first login it suggests the closest center, which becomes your host. [They are planning to have dynamic server selection in the future, for the traveller that travels to multiple continents.].

You now have a system, an “online PC”, which you actually power on like a real (physical) system. You then install the application you require onto the virtual system, as you would with your own system. You are running Windows in all its glory.

System Starting

The basic Air system contains 1-CPU, no GPU, and 4-GB of RAM, but this can be quickly kicked into higher gear with the Pro system, which has 4-CPUs, 1-GPU, and 16-GB of RAM. With this flexibility you can use the Air system for “lighter” type work and consume less credits.

Subscription is monthly which gets you an amount of credits. The amount of credits consumed switches on the fly. For example, you can use the less credit consuming Air system to work with things like MS Word, a browser, etc and then ramp up to the Pro system when you need 3D CAD modeling.

Frame - Desktop

The system initially contains 45 GB of disk storage, which boils down to 20-GB for the OS and 25 for applications. If you hit the wall, you can request an increase.

The intention is not to store data on the Frame system, but to your cloud storage. Frame currently provides support for Dropbox and beta support for Google Drive and Box. Connecting the drives was as easy as clicking the button and entering my username & password.


Frame - Add Drives


Drive - Mapped Drives

The status bar provides quick access to the Frame clipboard and Upload file option. Use the clipboard to paste items from your local clipboard into your Frame session clipboard. Use the upload file option to add files from your local system to the Frame system. When you are done with the file in the Frame session, either save it to your connected cloud storage or move it into the download area within Windows Explorer.

In the Frame for Business mode the user system defaults to stateless, meaning when the system is rebooted, it goes back to the default. This is unless you implement the option of storing user settings and configurations in their connected cloud storage.

The Administrator in the business option is provided tools to track usage and to install & manage both applications and web apps. The administrator installs software in the sandbox, publishes it to the production by the user, and sets up the environments UI with the applications they can access.

Remember how I mentioned they thought of everything? The Utility addon provides a general purpose Windows 2012 Server to host license managers, databases, and perhaps even a small Vault (PDM) database. Basically it’s an area to put things that are accessible by all systems under your Frame umbrella.

Another interesting feature is Elasticity, which is used to scale for peak usage. Say, for example, between the hours of 8 to 4 you set five max instances with 1 buffer. The buffer is up and running constantly, so that one system is ready to go. When the first person logs in and consumes the buffer system the next system boots to become the buffer. Once the buffer is exceeded then the next user has to wait for the system to power on.

The bottom of the Frame window provides real time statistics of your connection including the speed, distance to the Frame server, and latency. The more green circles you see the better your connection is. The requirements are not extreme as the minimum suggested for CAD modeling is 5mb/s and latency less than 100ms.

Frame - Stats


As mentioned earlier the process is to launch the Desktop and install the applications as you normally would. When the application is installed you will be prompted to Onboard it. When an app is onboarded it is accessible as a standalone application that can be run without first starting the system session. Great feature

Frame - Onboard


Fraem - Onboarded Apps


For my initial trial I used the Personal plan. I adjusted the Google Chrome start pages and installed AutoCAD and then Inventor. With both installations I just used the 30-day trial option from the Autodesk website.

AutoCAD installed without a hitch, but I ran into errors after it was dashboarded. However, as instructed by the error message I send support an email and within 15-minutes they replied in that it had been fixed… talk about customer service! I worked with AutoCAD both 2D and 3D on both the Air and Pro system states and honestly could not tell the difference between my locally installed AutoCAD and working within Frame. I will however always use the Pro system state when I’m working with AutoCAD 3D.

Frame - AutoCAD

Inventor was a bit different as initially I could not get it to install without the Frame system timing out. After a suggestion from Jared, I switched into the Pro mode and Inventor then installed without a problem. Jared has seen some CAD programs that without the graphics (GPU) in the Air instance, the installer stalls.

Since I was in the Pro mode Inventor worked flawlessly. I didn’t load it up with any extremely large assemblies, but worked with a couple 3000ish part assemblies and the performance was great.

Inventor in Frame

My Thoughts

I tried Frame on various connections and received mostly acceptable results. In fact on my work connection (+20mb/s, ~70ms latency) you would not be able to distinguish the performance between the local system and the Frame system. I did however get the dreaded singular red circle performance rating on my crappy wireless home connection (which according to was less than 4mb/s). The biggest hindrance on this connection was the graphics which became extremely grainy and slow to respond… but, it was actually still somewhat workable, but not something I’d want to use for extended periods of time. [NOTE: I found out after that this issue might have been related to using Google Chrome and that a fix is on its way]

I will admit that browsing the internet in a browser embedded in a browser caused me some grief in that I was constantly using the wrong address bar and toolbars!

I did not request a bump in disk storage so in my trials I downloaded each software installer to the virtual PC, but then had to remove them immediately to make room for the next software installation media. A suggestion I have for future versions is for the ability to create a temporary connection to a local drive, similar to how you can with virtualization systems like Oracle’s VirtualBox. I would use this  for software installations where I already have the installers (local media) and / or deployments ready to go. When I was done installing or powered off the system the local drive would be disconnected.

In Conclusion…. like with most “cloud” based services if you sit in the same spot, using the same system, day-in and day-out, there is going to be little advantage to using Frame. However, if you move around a lot (meaning you require remote access) I would seriously look at Frame.

I also see benefits when you have applications, that for cost reasons, you want to share amongst a group of users…. especially when that group of users is distributed across different offices in multiple locations (of course providing you comply with the software vendor’s licensing terms).

The Frame offering was well thought out creating a good user experience which will get you up and running in little time. The connection to cloud storage truly does provide the ability to log in anywhere, anytime, and continue right where you left off.


My new friends at Frame have extended an exclusive offer just for Design & Motion readers. For the first 50-readers to sign up with Frame, enter the code DESIGNMOTION2015 for $25 off Frame Personal or Frame for Business (expires 10/31/2015).

What’s New in Vault 2016? Copy Design 2.01

Vault 2016 puts me into a difficult position. For those of you who moved to Vault 2015 R2, the majority of the new features contained within 2016 you’ve already seen. For those (like me) who stayed on 2015, there is a lot new in 2016 as you didn’t use R2.So the dilemma…. do I blog about 2016 like it is all new? and just ignore 2015 R2 existed?

What I’ve decided to do is write about the 2016 features assuming that you’ve never seen them (as in never seen 2015 R2 or 2016), however, I will try to identify all things that have changed within 2016

The new and improved Copy Design is so significant Autodesk now labels it as an “Experience(ed: Very ‘Dassault’ of them!). If you haven’t seen it yet, you will probably be a bit shocked by how significantly different it is. I’m labeling the 2016 Copy Design as version 2.01, as 2015 R2 introduced the new “2.0” Copy Design and 2016 only slightly tweaks it.


photo credit: JOH_1143 via photopin (license)

Allan O’Leary is doing a very, very, very deep dive of Copy Design over at Under the Hood. Its a very good read as it is both informative and fun, in a way only Allan can. My post however, is not the “long and short of it”, it is only the short. It is the meat and potatoes of Copy Design, meant to give you my impression and get you up and running in no time.

Copy Design 2.01

I should start by saying that for anyone using Vault Basic, you will continue to use the 2015 Copy Design. The new Copy Design “Experience” is only available for Vault Workgroup and Vault Professional users.

So what was so wrong with the old Copy Design?

There are many things about the old Copy Design that I liked. It was easily accessed, it autoloaded the file I had selected and its children. It was easy to tag components with the actions I wanted (after I learned the hold CTRL to toggle all trick). It also had a flow and feeling that didn’t make me feel like I was leaving Vault for something else… it was a part of Vault.

Copy Design however, is not always the most intuitive. For example, Find and Replace is available but only if you know the magical sweet spots to right-click. It also becomes clunky when you start getting into large datasets. It’s clunky as it’s difficult to navigate to find the items you want copied, the ones you want replaced, excluded, etc.

The New UI Experience

Copy Design Dialog

The User Interface (UI) is completely overhauled allowing for more feedback, user customization, and different sorting (ed: while nice, it’s yet another Vault UI variant). Although some similarities in workflow to Get / Checkout, it really is a different experience.  Although it can be launched from within Vault [new to 2016] it is actually a standalone application. You can additionally start Copy Design from the start menu.

Copy Design Start Menu Location

Copy Design now supports more than one dataset at a time. It also supports AutoCAD Electrical Projects (finally). It also now works on non-CAD files… meaning any file stored within your Vault is eligible to participate in a copy design.

Although standalone the window behaves as other Vault windows. The displayed properties (columns) are adjusted by dragging-and-dropping. If additional properties are required (desired), right-click on any column and use Choose Columns to add or remove properties. The view is persistent, meaning it will be as you left it the next time you use Copy Design.

A nice bonus feature which would be nice at times in other windows, is the right-click options for a quick expand-all or collapse-all. The expand options include 2-levels, 3-levels, 4-levels, and All options.

Other new features:

  • copy individual instances (opposed to all instances)
  • replace parts with copies that were created during the active copy
  • configure different actions for drawings
  • use circular references, such as substitute parts and drawing overlays.

The copying process has been completely restructured which should lead to much greater performance. With the previous version files were copied local to your system (into the temp) for the magic to happen (copying and renaming) and then checked back in as the new files. Although this happened invisibly to the user it was still time consuming, especially the file transfer back-and-forth between your system and the server. The copying now occurs completely on the server leading to greatly reduced copying times, significantly improving performance.

The Workflow

If you launched Copy Design from the Vault client your dataset is already loaded, or at least the start. If you required more data or if you launched Copy Design standalone use the big plus sign icon in the toolbar to browse for and select files to include in the copy operation. One caveat is there is no search, that’s right I’ll say it again, there is no search using the add file option within Copy Design…. it’s straight up browsing file structure (maybe Copy Design 3.0?)

Copy Design - Add Files

Use Add Children (in the ribbon) to quickly add attachments and Library files.

To remove drawings from the view, disable Drawing Views from the application menu. Enable Automatically Copy Parents so that as you select a component to copy its parent is automatically selected. Disable Select References when you only want to copy the instance of the component, not all references of it in the assembly.

Copy Design App Menu

Right-click on the components in the list to set the action. The available options will vary on the component level and the file type. The options include:

  • Copy: Toggles the component to copy creating a new file in the same location as the original
  • Copy To: Similar to Copy but you will be prompted to select the destination folder for the new copy
  • Copy Branch: Sets the action to Copy for the selected item as well as all of its children
  • Replace: Browse for and select a replacement file
  • Reuse: Is the default action and can be used to remove an action like Copy
  • Reuse Branch: Sets the action to Reuse for the selected item as well as all of its children
  • Exclude: removes the instance from the new copied assembly

Use the new Actions panel to quickly filter out the files with the assigned action. For example, selecting the “Exclude” tab displays just the files set with the exclude action. The action of the files can be toggled via right-click in these views as well. This has proven to be a great way to check what I’m actually copying and other actions and make adjustments… especially opposed to navigating up and down the navigation tree with larger assemblies.. Remember that nothing is committed until you click the Create Copy button, which is when it initiates the copy process.

The Where Used panel provides a Source and Destination option to quickly see where the files are coming from (Source) and where the copies are going (Destination). Because you can copy individual instances (now) a particular component might have multiple destinations.

Copy Design Where Used

Use the Folders Panel to review the source and destination folders of the copied data, a different view of the Where Used Panel. This shows where the copied files are going, so you can insure they end up in the correct location. As a bonus, you can apply operations based on the folder location. You can also drag-and-drop files between folders or from the main view to add to the copy.

Using the Numbering Panel

The biggest change, and most likely the one that takes the most to get used to, is the Numbering Panel. You do not adjust the name of copied components from anywhere BUT the Numbering Panel. The Numbering Panel lists the files to be copied and is what you use to set the new names. This Panel displays tabs for each numbering scheme used within Copy Design. It organizes the files based on the scheme applied.

Copy Design Numbering Pane

With files with no scheme applied, you can manually adjust the destination file name, apply a prefix (before the base name) or postfix (after the base name). You can apply changes to the three (pre, post, and base) on a selection of files. The options presented on the specific numbering scheme tab is completely dependent on the numbering scheme.

In Summary

Vault Copy Design 2.01 is a case of the good, the bad, and the ugly… well, not quite as it is more of the great, the good, and the bad.

Great is the new features like multiple datasets, AutoCAD Electrical project support, and copying instances opposed to all references.

Good is some of the workflow items like the action panels, the right-click expand options, and the exclusion of drawings from the view.

Bad is the separate window, with its look & feel and workflow different from all other features in Vault. When you launch Copy Design, it truly does feel like a standalone, separate product from Vault. Inconsistencies in software workflows make it difficult for new users to learn and difficult for users who don’t use the feature all the time to be productive.

Ugly Sweater

photo credit: Vintage 80s 8-Bit Scottie Dogs Tacky Ugly Christmas Sweater via photopin (license)

What’s New in Vault 2016 Review

Autodesk pulled a sneaky one and released the Vault 2016 help a few weeks ago without any press release, blog post, or any type of notification. So although the product wasn’t available, we were able to read all about the new features ahead of today’s release. Make sure you read the System Requirements changes at the end of this post, big changes in your environment may be required.

Here are the listed categories for the new features.

  • New Item, BOM, and Change Order Features and Enhancements
  • New Copy Design Experience
  • Vault Thin Client Enhancements
  • New Vault Office Thick Client
  • Inventor and Third-Party CAD File Support
  • Project Sync Enhancements
  • Control Open File Behaviors in the Vault Client Feature
  • ADMS Console Enhancements

I’m both disappointed and a bit perplexed with both the What’s New help and the overall message by Autodesk. There is no differentiation in the what’s new help between the three flavours of Vault. Some, like anything to do with Items, is crystal clear (only applies to Vault Pro) but many you have to read between the lines and make some educated guesses to determine if the enhancement applies to your Vault. Others, I have no clue which versions they apply, you’ll have to find out when you start using Vault. There is also little-to-no mention or indication of the features that were introduced with Vault 2015 R2. This makes the list seem very significant for 2016, when really probably close to half the new features were actually introduced with R2.

I don’t want this to be a distraction from the excitement of the new features, as there still are some significant ones, but be careful when reading through the document as not everything may apply to the type of Vault you are using.

Christmas Sparklers Fun

If you are not currently using Vault 2015 R2 then before you dive into the new features within 2016 I would start with our Autodesk Vault 2015 R2 Summary, This was our summary of the enhancements added with 2015 R2 from last year, and so it serves as a good starting point to see what’s new with 2016 as well.

License Management

For this review, I’m going to start in an odd place… the Autodesk Data Management Console (ADMS) and FlexLM. That’s right, there are some kick-ass system management tools added that I don’t want to get lost in the mix.

Vault 2015 R2 introduced a new reindex option. Re-indexing now comes in the form of three options: Re-index lastest and released versions only, re-index lastest versions only, and re-index all versions. The new option (latest only) provides more flexibility and an option that should complete sooner than the other two. Also from a revision management perspective should a released object really be touched in any way?

Because of the architecture of Vault and how it is integrated with the FlexLM license management tools, it has always been difficult to determine who is currently logged into Vault and difficult to get any usage history. This all changes with 2016. FlexLM now logs by username, opposed to the generic AutodeskVault, meaning you can quickly determine who is currently using a license. The license reporting tools now apply to Vault, just like they have always done with the other Autodesk products. As a bonus, you can now reserve a license, saving the license for a particular user or user group. [Yay!!!!!!!]

Vault Office Thick Client

First introduced for Vault 2015 customers, non-subscription customers can now use the Vault Office Client. Think of it as the full client, minus all CAD related functionality. With the Office Client, you don’t only get access to check-in and check-out but also the ability to apply lifecycles to folders, files, and items, and to participate in Change Orders. Using this you can also generate reports and work with custom objects. It’s not free, but costs less than a license of Vault Workgroup and Vault Professional.

As a bonus, with 2016 and the licensing improvements you can now segregate the Vault Office licenses away from your other Vault licenses, reserving them specifically for non-CAD people.

Vault Thin Client Enhancements

With all the changes to items and the bill of materials, the web-based thin client is enhanced to support the new features.
  • BOM filters to toggle the display of OFF rows and whether you see non-released items
  • The thin client now supports ON, OFF, and non-assigned item BOM rows
  • Support for the new Grouped BOM rows and BOM specific properties (which can only be controlled within the administration settings, making it impossible to filter the BOM’s on-the-fly, even in the full client application!)
  • View item versions
  • Reference Designator integration for viewing AutoCAD Electrical BOM data

Inventor and Third-Party CAD File Support

Autodesk has expanded support for 3rd party CAD data within Vault. This is due to Inventor’s new AnyCAD workflow where non-Inventor data can be associatively attached to a model. From the Vault help, here are the restrictions.

Autodesk Vault Help 3rd Party CAD Restrictions

Project Sync Enhancements

Vault 2015 R2 introduced enhancements to Project Sync, which is the service that automates the publishing of Vault data to Autodesk Buzzsaw. This feature is specific to Vault Professional, and the updated features extend to 2016 as well.

  • Previously all files contained within a mapped folder would be uploaded to Buzzsaw, whether needed or not. Now the user can select which files within the mapped folder are uploaded, reducing the amount of unnecessary files shared.
  • Project Sync jobs can now be configured to fire on transition state changes, for example from In Review to Released.

File Revision Rollback

Yup! Now when you accidentally change the state of a bunch of files, you can roll back to the previous revision, essentially undoing your mistake! BUT, there are some caveats which we will cover in a future post.

Systems Requirements Changes

There are some big ones!!

  • The 2012 editions of Windows Server are the ONLY releases supported!! That’s right you need to upgrade from Server 2008 or 2008 R2.
  • SQL Server 2012 is the ONLY supported release of SQL. 

So make sure you have your upgrade plans in places before getting too excited about upgrading. Also be sure to read the release notes for any known issues or peculiarities.

Everything Else

Over the next two weeks, we’ll be doing a deep-dive into the enhancements of the following topics. Make sure to come back to check them out.

  1. Copy Design Experience
  2. Item & BOM enhancements
  3. New Unified Lifecycle, Category, Numbering Scheme, and Revision Experience

Presenting Inventor 2016 (What’s New With Presentations?)

Described as the “red-headed stepchild” of Inventor in our introduction post on Inventor 2016, the Presentation environment has gone a long (and I mean a long) time without any updates, tweaks, changes, improvements, or really anything to write home about. The Presentation Environment remained almost identical to when it was first introduced in R2 of the software…. and that was in 2000! What else within Inventor has remained unchanged for 15 years?

So although there is still lots of room for improvement, I’m glad to finally see some much-needed enhancements. So what’s new?

I put the updates into these two categories:

  • Environment brought up to par
  • Improved Tweaking

Environment / UI Enhancements

Many of the enhancements to the Presentation environment have been in other places for the past couple of years, but it doesn’t make it any less impactful for building the exploded views.

Window Selection

Components can be selected by both window and crossing selections. You don’t really truly understand how much you missed something until you have it. Being able to quickly select objects by a window selection can significantly streamline the process.

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Window


You’ve always been able to set the Representations on Presentation View creation, but now you can switch the active Design View at any time... not just during creation. In addition, the associative option can be enabled or disabled whenever. What does Associative do? If enabled, changes to the assembly’s design view automatically update within the Presentation. This includes component visibility and component color

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Representations

Browser Views

Gone is the little filter icon with no indication of which browser view is active. Within 2016, it behaves as the Part and Assembly browser.

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Browser Filter

Tweak Components Minitoolbar

The big, clunky, dialog is gone! Replaced with the newer style Minitoolbar. Everything is accessible from one compact interface. This includes the option to change the selection filter WHILE you are applying tweaks!

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Mini Toolbars


Triad Manipulator

At first glance it might seem like a small thing… whoo hooo they changed the icon to represent tweak direction. However, its more, you are now forced to use the triad meaning no more unintentional selection of additional components not intended for the current tweak operation. To tweak a component click-and-drag on the triad arrow in the direction you want to tweak the component. Another great enhancement is with the Triad comes in-canvas text boxes. As you click on the triad and apply tweaks you can also specify exact values.

Inventor 2016 Presentations - In Canvas TextIt’s also important to note that when you initially position the triad, it automatically selects the component it is snapped to.

Move vs. Continous Move

This is a nice little enhancement. To mimic 2015 (and older) behavior, use the Continous Move option. As you apply tweaks the components remain selected. This builds a workflow in which you can tweak a group of components, apply the tweak, then shift + select to deselect a component (or more), and continue to apply tweaks. With the Move option, the components are tweaked and when applied the components are all deselected.

Select Sets

When applying a tweak the selected components can be dynamically adjusted, adding and removed components. The preview automatically updates as you add and remove components to the selection set, even after you’ve started to apply the tweak. Even better than this is that it now extends to editing tweaks. This means you can modify an existing tweak to add a component or remove components from the tweak. No more creating a new tweak to match up the component already tweaked.

Dynamic Previews / Undo

Tweaks now preview before being applied! You can now undo during the tweaking process! Enough said

Auto Explode

It used to be all or nothing… you auto exploded the components at view creation or you didn’t explode it at all. Auto Explode is now its own ribbon icon meaning the assembly can be exploded at any time during the process OR selected objects of the assembly can be auto exploded.

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Auto Explode


Trails, I know you don’t like me and I don’t like you, but we need together” Who hasn’t said this about trails at least once during their time in Inventor? Trails definitely got some lovin’ in this release

First, there are now four “default” trail options as you are building tweaks…. None to not create trails, Components to only add trails to top-level components, All Parts to apply trails to everything, and Single to apply a single trail to all the components being actively tweaked…. Brilliant!

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Default Trails

The new trail selection filter (used when either creating or editing a trail) provides the means to delete or add either the full trail (following all tweaks) or a trail for a portion of the path.

Inventor 2016 Presentations - Trail Filters

See it in Action!

Autodesk Inventor 2016 – Drawing Environment Improvements

I used to spend most of my waking hours creating Inventor drawings during certain stages of projects, a few years back. Thankfully, those days are over, now that I’m working for a reseller, and I don’t spend nearly as much time in the drawing environment anymore. Don’t get me wrong, I really like the environment, but I’m sure monotony sets in for anyone who does hundreds of drawings a year in any package. Having said all that, I sure wish some of the new drawing features that Autodesk have put into the 2016 release, were available back then, as they would have made things just that little bit easier.

Let’s get straight into it.

Creating a new Drawing:

You have been able to open a model file, RMB in the browser and select “OpenDrawing” for the last few releases. That was useful, but the drawing had to have been created first. What you can do now, is get the model into the orientation and configuration (view / positional reps) in the modelling environment, and then RMB on the filename in the browser and then select “Create Drawing View.” This automatically teleports you into the drawing environment, and leaves you at the view placement stage, with all the relevant settings pre-configured. Small detail, but a nice touch.

Create Drawing View in 2016Create Drawing View

View Placement:

This is the area which has had the biggest overhaul in the 2016 release. View placement is much more streamlined than it used to be, and gives far more control. On base view placement, a manipulator pops up which allows you to move, scale, and generate new views. A nifty addition is the inclusion of a View Cube, which allows you to rotate the base view, and all the projected views will also rotate to suit. A nifty trick with the scaling, is that you can hold the CTRL key while you drag the arrow, to avoid it “snapping” to standard scales. This is useful if you don’t use scales on your drawings and want to simply adjust the size of the view for the best fit.

Place ViewsView Placement Enhancements


There have been a number of improvements to ballooning, including a really handy “Align to Edge” option, the ability to use a sketched symbol as your ballon shape, and a window selection to align balloons. There is also supposed to be an improvement to the “Auto Balloon” placement, but I have not had a lot of success getting it to give better results. The leaders don’t cross over each other as much anymore, but the placement of the arrowheads doesn’t seem very neat or logical.

The little details:

  • Sketch creation behaviour is more consistent between drawings and models now. What I mean by that, is you can now click the “Start Sketch” command in a drawing first, and then decide which view or sheet you want to sketch on. You used to have to pick the view first, which was frustrating.
  • One thing that used to annoy me, was that a section view would section nuts and bolts, and other fasteners by default, and you would have to go through and manually remove them from the section participation. This is now fixed, and they are not sectioned by default.
  • A lot of small incremental improvements have been made to leaders, sketched symbols. One of note, is you now have the ability to define a shared “Sketched Symbol” library so that your custom symbols can be shared across your team. I really hope Autodesk do this for Sketch Blocks next!
  • It was pointed out to me that there is currently an issue with editing a Section-view definition sketch. If you RMB the section line in the view, and then select “Edit Sketch” it actually takes you to a new sketch, not the one you want to edit. The workaround is to RMB the sketch entry in the browser, and then edit it from there.
  • If you’re creating a drawing of an .ipn, and want to use a saved view. It’s not immediately obvious to find that option anymore, as it has been moved. In the new View Creation dialog, while placing a view of the .ipn, RMB the View Cube and then select “Saved View” to access your saved .ipn view.
  • Often users will need to place a view with a custom orientation. In previous releases you could achieve this via a button in the Drawing View dialog. Now it’s stashed away in the View Cube context menu.

Autodesk Inventor 2016 Saved Camera View

All in all, I think these new features and enhancements should add up to realise some time savings for Inventor users who create a lot of drawings.

Now, back to playing with T-splines!

AutoCAD 2016 What’s New Review

Spring always brings new beginnings, including the new releases from Autodesk. This year is no different as the new version of AutoCAD is upon us. Although nothing earth-shattering like last years user interface “refresh”, this years version still proves to be chocked full of enhancements that will make your day-to-day life easier, as well as adding new features and functionality to take your design and collaboration in new directions.

What’s New?

Others might slice-and-dice it differently, but to me the new features and improvements fall into five categories

  1. User Interface
  2. Documentation
  3. Design
  4. BIM
  5. Installation and Configuration

The User Interface (UI) enhancements is a continuation of what they introduced with the darker / sleeker 2015 interface. Take for example the File tab introduced in 2015. It is now known as the Start page and is persistent, but based on user feedback, can be disabled during installation. Layout tabs are drag-and-dropable (finally), the status bar automatically wraps to the next line, and the help makes it easier to find things.

AutoCAD 2016 Wrapping Commandline

The new System Monitor is constantly watching those troublesome system variables that seem to have a mind of themselves. It lets you know that they have changed and allows for a reset directly from the status bar.

AutoCAD 2016 System Variable Monitor Dialog

Documentation Enhancements? Yep, its got them…

Revision Clouds behave more like polylines, making modifications significantly easier and actually achievable now… no more deleting and redrawing.

AutoCAD 2016 Rev Cloud Stretching Grip

The enhanced DIM command will make you seriously reconsider how you dimension from now on. Think of it as Quick Dimensions but on steroids. Its a one-stop, do-all dimension feature which actually previews the dimension before you make your selection.

PDF support? Still there of course, but now it’s much more flexible, with its own publishing dialog and options. It should also be much faster.

Reality Computing (Point Clouds) got its fair share of loving too, including support for sectioning, transparency control, point cloud-specific object snaps, and Dynamic UCS support.

Any visualization changes? Oh yeah! The Render engine has gone, replaced with a new and improved version. It is physically based, making it easier yet creating much better results.

Design & BIM based collaboration gets some love. External Reference support is expanded to include Navisworks Files (NWD or NWC). This allows for the attachment of the “Coordination Model”, for an additional collaboration option.

What’s Next?

Over the next week (or so), we’ll be posting deeper dives into the new features.

3Dconnexion CadMouse – Hands On Review

Last week 3Dconnexion announced the imminent release of the world’s first mouse for CAD professionals. The announcement coincided nicely with this weeks SolidWorks World 2015 event in Phoenix, which allowed them to show it off in person to the masses. So for those of you who didn’t get to see it, or couldn’t attend SWW15, I’ve put together this hands on review of the CadMouse. Continue Reading

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