Carl Bass, CEO, Autodesk  

  • “I think, not since the industrial revolution has there been such a broad and radical rethinking of the way that we make things.”
  • “The biggest change has been the ability to work with much richer data. Data that better captures the complexity of the real world.”
  • “We’re breaking the glass that separates the real world from the digital world to better create.”
  • “What this (capture data) does is allow the computer to take on more of the foundational work. Work to build the model, so that more time can be spent, by you, designing.”
  • “60,000 of you have taken advantage of A360.”
  • “A360 digitizes the way you get together and gives you a place to collaborate.”
  • “Fusion provides the context to understand what is going on in your project and gives you access to the interactions of all the people involved.”
  • “The cloud provides a natural hub for you to collaborate.”
  • “In this new world, collaboration and design management are built into everything. It’s not just another task layered on top.”
  • “Paper and screens are inadequate for output. So I’d like to show you how we’re bringing 3D models into the physical world.”
  • “The printer doesn’t care if you’re printing a cube or something super complicated.”
  • “3D printing is the closest thing we have to the Star Trek replicator.”
  • “We’re all working together to push the limits of 3D printing.”
  • “We’ve established the $100 million Spark investment fund to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and researchers who are really pushing the limits of 3D printing.”
  • “CNC machines are poised to reinvent themselves.”
  • “BIM360 is the fastest growing product we’ve ever had.”

Jeff Kowalski, CTO, Autodesk

  • “In my 9 years as the CTO at Autodesk, this is the biggest change I’ve seen.”
  • “At Autodesk, we’re starting to look at technology and design itself through the lens of nature, a complete inversion of the traditional perspective.”
  • “We’re looking at the world through nature.”
  • “Using everything that is for whatever will be – that’s nature.”
  • “We’ve started to look at the design process as a living process.”
  • “Nature only moves forward, and for us to experience similar progress we need to consider the huge corpus of potentially relevant ideas and designs that already exist.”
  • “We can now discover and expose the content and the context of all the current designs for all of your next designs.”
  • “Adding context not only expresses what they (designs) are, but it also reveals what they’re for, what they do and how they work.”
  • “We’re developing a system that learns the same way we do… and the outcome is a tool that works in a lifelike manner and supports the way we solve problems naturally.”
  • “We need to stop telling the computer what to do and instead tell the computer what we want to achieve.”
  • “Generative design mimics natures approach to design. Generative design starts with your goals and then it explores all the possible permeations of a solution through successive generations until the best one is found.”
  • “This (generative design) is expanding human potential.”
  • “Generative design is not new…it wasn’t practical until now.”
  • “Like nature, the computer has created a design solution.”
  • “The things that we design now and in the future need to do three things – they need to sense, respond and collaborate.”
  • “Collecting data, even big data, isn’t enough. We need our objects and environments to also respond. To take some kind of action based on that sensory input.”
  • “The most enlightened things that we’ll design will be those that are actually capable of collaborating with each other to create new experiences for us.”
  • “Experiences don’t come from the things they come from you – the designer.”
  • “I think it is inevitable that we bring designs to life.”
  • “Looking ahead we need to harass the twin engines of design and nature.”
  • “There are whole territories ahead where we can take nature’s strengthens and extend them with technologies’ power.”

Keynote Presentation